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In Emotional Agility

Symptoms of Anxiety

symptoms of anxiety

Anxiety is a part of everyday life in the new millennium. But for people, it expresses itself much worse than for others. Anxiety symptoms that go beyond the typical expressions of unease and nervousness should not be ignored. While many people can expect to suffer an anxiety attack at some point in their life, recurring episodes of extreme anxiety are not normal.

Anxiety itself is good. It serves as the body’s warning system that something may be amiss; that we need to move into a state of preparedness. Among these anxiety symptoms are a rapid heartbeat, dry mouth, and sudden perspiration. Surely nobody reading this has ever managed to escape those sensations.

But how many have been found themselves in stressful situations in which they became dizzy, grew short of breath, felt pain in their chest, and a sudden need to urinate? While these are all common symptoms of everyday anxiety, if you find yourself feeling all of them, chances are you have gone beyond the norm and experiencing an actual anxiety attack. If you experience these symptoms on more than a few occasions, you may be to the point where you should consult a doctor.

Still, even these anxiety symptoms do not definitely mean you are experiencing an anxiety disorder. After all, the human body responds differently to varying situations of stress. For some people, the very thought of walking onto a stage and speaking to a large crowd of people would bring on all of the above symptoms without it necessarily indicating a disorder.

However, if in addition to the above, you also experience one or more of these anxiety symptoms, it is past the point where you should at least be conducting some research. If you begin to experience deep feelings of apprehension, or even outright dread, of certain situations even when you are not anywhere near to being in those situations and you experience the physical symptoms, chances are you anxiety is to the point of a disorder. In addition, isolation of oneself from others can often be a sign of a more serious problem.

Nervousness, jittery behaviour, irritability, jumpiness; all of these are normal responses under certain circumstances, but if you notice a link between feeling them and either facing or just thinking about stress-inducing environments or events, it may be time to consider professional help.

Anxiety symptoms are a normal part of the day for most of us. Unless you get to work at your dream job and then go back to your dream home life, chances are you will experience a facing pulse, or a dry mouth today. It can be difficult to determine if the anxiety you are feeling is normal or something more. The worst thing to do is compare your reactions to anybody else; what may seem excessive to them might be normal for you. However, if you do find yourself experiencing these anxiety symptoms and you are concerned, seek out the advice of friends and family to help locate the possible source of your anxiety.

Dealing with Anxiety

Nobody has any fun with persisting anxiety problems. Nobody understands your situation when you are suffering from anxiety until and unless that person himself or herself has suffered from anxiety. Therefore, in such cases seeking medical attention or you can learn a few courses of action of self-help, which would help your deal better when you are anxious.

Sometimes ‘professional help’ alone won’t help, we’ve all heard of people becoming physically and psychologically dependent on medication, so it can be worth trying a few things that will help your anxiety, by taking control of your situation.

5 Tips to Dealing With Anxiety

Check your diet

When we have a balanced diet then our bodies tend to function better. If there are no adequate vitamins, minerals in our diet then it might lead to emotional and mental troubles.

Panic disorders can be caused due to deficiency in the regular diet. 200 mg of calcium and 1000 mg of magnesium can be added to your regular diet. Inclusion of iron, potassium, selenium, and chromium will help you to deal with anxiety self-help. Eating a lot of vegetables, whole grains and nuts can be taken as a self-help tool in managing anxiety.

You must avoid refined sugar, soft drinks, alcohol, coffee, and any else that has caffeine content like tea, coffee, or chocolate.

Get Some Exercise

Regular exercising will help your body to relax and relieve it from stress and help toning your body. Therefore, exercising helps in alleviating anxiety.

You must include a 30 minutes exercising program daily. Exercising helps in producing endorphins making you feel better after you exercise.

Learn How To Relax

It is important to learn to pursue activities that will help you to relax. Listening to music, talking to a friend, meditate, working on a crossword puzzle, read a good book, take a walk, a nap, paint a picture, or some other hobby? Doing things that you enjoy will help to alleviate your stress.

Get Enough Sleep

If you are stressed and suffering from anxiety as a result, then try to get some deep and proper sleep. Sleep is a natural relaxer and sleeping will do good to you when you are suffering from anxiety. Learn to let some of those other things go and perform some anxiety self-help.

Remove a Negative Attitude

There are various external forces that may add a negativity in you, which might lead to stress. Try and avoid developing any negative feelings. Such feelings can only spoil your day. To avoid such feelings, grow in you may take help of the self-help methods and those are bound to help!

What Causes Anxiety

Anxiety is a bit of a common phenomenon in today’s stress-filled world. Most people have already experienced the sudden palpitations, the sweaty palms, and that overwhelming sense of dread. People inherently understand the power that fear holds over them and can sometimes even recognize when fear becomes too much for them. Fear is often said to trigger sudden battles with anxiety in even the toughest and most hardened minds. This is because fear grips everyone and is as clearly defined and universal as the concept of death. However, what most people don’t seem to understand is that fear is not the sole trigger of an attack, although it always plays a role. There are disorders out there, mostly of the psychological variety, that can also trigger an attack.

Interestingly, statistics show that acne is a powerful trigger for anxiety, particularly among teenagers and young adults. In fact, it is cited as being among the most common sources of anxiety in the US and certain European countries. The causes for this reaction are readily obvious to the teenagers themselves but can sometimes be elusive to adults. The teen years are an age where social development and peer acceptance tend to play prominent roles in people’s psychology. Acne and other skin infections can become a hindrance to achieving the above goals, putting them in a precarious position along the social ladder. This is among the most prevalent problems that cause teen anxiety. aside from situations involving immediate family.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) has also been known to trigger anxiety, among other potential side effects. This is particularly true if the object of the obsession involves either harming others or being harmed personally. Being obsessed with avoiding physical harm can often make someone extremely anxious about being placed in any environment that they perceive to be potentially hazardous. It should be painfully clear just how dangerous a person who is obsessed with inflicting pain upon other people would be in any society, even though it usually causes conflicts with the cultural mores that the person has been raised with. In this case, the anxiety often stems from the fact that the desire to inflict pain exists, acting as a subtle difference between these people and actual sadists.

Weight disorders generally stem from unfounded fear and anxiety and are often capable of generating enough of the latter on their own to keep the cycle going. However, in most cases, fear is the root of the disorder, along with peer pressure and poor self-perception, but not necessarily one of the potential psychological complications.

Phobias can also cause someone to feel anxious and overly worried, particularly when around the object of the phobia or threatened with it. According to some studies, some specific phobias are more effective at this than others, particularly if the object of the phobia is a commonplace occurrence, person, or item. Cases, where the phobia stemmed from a traumatic experience during the formative years, are also immensely powerful at causing a person to develop anxious feelings, even in the long-term. Agoraphobia and claustrophobia are known to have this sort of effect on certain individuals.

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